Reading images

How true should historical fiction be?

Boundaries, curated by Becky Campbell

Curator and artist Becky Campbell and the newly established cultural spaces Artscape Athens and Snehta Residency invite you to the opening of the exhibition, Boundaries.

We are continually crossing and encountering boundaries in our daily lives, sometimes aware and sometimes oblivious. We cross over districts of a city; through doors; we shift between being awake (vertical) and asleep (horizontal); between hungry and full.

Boundaries presents the works of 32 creators: 28 artists, two writers, an actor and a musician. The two spaces (Artscape Athens and Snehta) are filled with videos, photographs, paintings, drawings, collages, sculptures, structures and installations as well as performances and interventions in the five-minutes’ walk between.

Each work explores a particular angle related to boundaries – the uncanny, the shadow, liminality, non-spaces, being segregated from a home country, the impossibility of fully comprehending the thoughts of another being, political change, geographical shifts and many others. By bringing such a variety of approaches and mediums into dialogue within and across the two hosting locations similarities and connections of these encounters become prevalent.

21-30 March 2014 Opening 20 March 8-10 pm

Artscape Athens | Moschonision 5, Plateia Amerikis, Athens 112 52

Snehta | Aghias Zonis 1, Kypseli, Athens 113 61

Monday-Friday 5-9 pm

Saturday | Sunday: 12-9 pm

Curated by Becky Campbell

Participants:

Alexandros Laios | Andrew Mason | Christos Vagiatas | Christos Papamichael | Despina Flessa | Despoina Sevasti | Dickie Webb | Dimitris Papoutsakis | Dimitris Patsaros | Elliott Burns | Elli Paxinou | Foteini Palpana | Giannis Amanatidis | Giannis Cheimonakis | Giannis Sinioroglou | Irini Bachlitzanaki | Ivan Masteropoulos | Jack Burton | Konstantinos Kotsis | Kosmas Nikolaou | Kostas Tzimoulis | Maro Fasouli | Matina Charalambi | Panos Mattheou | Panos Profitis | Pantelis Yiannakis | Rachael Cloughton | Rilène Markopoulou | Stephanie Mann | Vasilis Gerodimos | Vassilis Noulas | Zoe Hatziyannaki

The exhibition is being hosted by Artscape Athens and Snehta Residency:

Artscape Athens – An Open Cultural Landscape. Artscape Athens is located at Moschonision 5 Street, in between the borders of Kypseli and Amerikis Square. Since the beginning of 2014 it constitutes the space for cultural expression and artistic creation of the non-profit organisation, Hellenic Museum of Fairytales. Artscape Athens aims to support every act of artistic making and promote local creative ideas. The participatory aspect of its actions constitutes an ongoing motive; therefore it is open in receiving applications for projects and exhibitions from those interested in introducing their work to the broader public.

Snehta Residency is a small private organization that was formed in 2012 in Athens with the purpose to bring international artists in contact with the Athenian art scene. The artists are selected to live and work in Athens for two months in the Kypseli apartment. Snehta – (Athens in reverse) is a metaphorical name suggesting a deeper reading of the city. Snehta aims to expand artistic activity and research in the City, whilst supporting practices focusing on contemporary issues through an experimental and ingenuous approach. Snehta fosters new relationships and collaborations internally and beyond the confines of Athens, Greece.

Becky Campbell is a Scottish artist and curator living in Athens. Previously she has worked for The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh and DESTE Foundation in Athens. She is part of the team running Snehta Residency in Kypseli, Athens, as well as an organiser of independent projects. Curated projects includeVirtual Materiality for ekthesis-online.com, a at The Demarco Archive, Edinburgh and The WOT Gallery, Edinburgh. She has exhibited internationally in exhibitions including: Gaesahud, Konseptheimilid Sigmar, Reykjavik, Iceland; YELLOW, 2025 Kunst und Kultur e.V., Hamburg, Germany; Short-lived Settlements, Snehta, Athens; Come Ye Hither, Crofter’s Lodge, Loch Eport, North Uist, Scotland; three thousand seven hundred and two, JDM Foundation, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

For further information contact: Becky Campbell & Snehta Residency: becky@snehtaresidency.org Artscape Athens: info@artscapeathens.gr | τηλ. 211 1829117

http://kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/exhibitions/9156
The history of the 20th and early 21st centuries is one that is scarred by incomprehensibly violent events with far-reaching effects. It is an era of world wars, totalitarian mass terror, social and ethnic cleansing, revolutions, civil wars, radical uprootings, and terrorism. In the Aftermath of Trauma: Contemporary Video Installations presents the work of five video artists from around the world who employ their medium to explore individual and collective memories of such traumatic experiences.
The artists included in the exhibition employ the so-called semidocumentary video format, provocatively hovering between fact and fiction, history and memory, while using cinematic projection spaces. Engaging with trauma as a belated response, they probe ways of comprehensionthat go beyond the dichotomy of head-on confrontation versus denial or repression to suggest a more nuanced and complex relationship between the original event and its present recollection.

http://kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/exhibitions/9156

The history of the 20th and early 21st centuries is one that is scarred by incomprehensibly violent events with far-reaching effects. It is an era of world wars, totalitarian mass terror, social and ethnic cleansing, revolutions, civil wars, radical uprootings, and terrorism. In the Aftermath of Trauma: Contemporary Video Installations presents the work of five video artists from around the world who employ their medium to explore individual and collective memories of such traumatic experiences.

The artists included in the exhibition employ the so-called semidocumentary video format, provocatively hovering between fact and fiction, history and memory, while using cinematic projection spaces. Engaging with trauma as a belated response, they probe ways of comprehension
that go beyond the dichotomy of head-on confrontation versus denial or repression to suggest a more nuanced and complex relationship between the original event and its present recollection.

The File Room Censorship Archive home page

Initiated as an artist’s project by Antonio Muntadas, The File Room was originally produced byRandolph Street Gallery (a non-profit artist run center in Chicago,IL, 1979-1998) with the support of the School of Art and Design and the Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago

David Thorne Be Happy (2004)

David Thorne Be Happy (2004)

Julia Meltzer and David Thorne | We will live to see these things, or, five pictures of what may come to pass

“We will live to see these things, or, five pictures of what may come to pass” is a documentary video in five parts about competing visions of an uncertain future. Shot in 2005–06 in Damascus, Syria, each section of the piece—the chronicle of a building in downtown Damascus, a recitation anticipating the arrival of a perfect leader, an interview with a dissident intellectual, a portrait of a Qur’an school for young girls, and an imagining of the world made anew—offers a different perspective on what might come to pass in a place where people live between the competing forces of a repressive regime, a growing conservative Islamic movement, and intense pressure from the United States.

http://www.theyrule.net/

They Rule aims to provide a glimpse of some of the relationships of the US ruling class. It takes as its focus the boards of some of the most powerful U.S. companies, which share many of the same directors. Some individuals sit on 5, 6 or 7 of the top 1000 companies. It allows users to browse through these interlocking directories and run searches on the boards and companies. A user can save a map of connections complete with their annotations and email links to these maps to others. They Rule is a starting point for research about these powerful individuals and corporations

Michael Takeo Magruder

Fallujah, Iraq 31.03.2004

http://www.takeo.org/nspace/ns011/As a consequence of technological advances, the Media now generates a ‘real-time’ history in which the infinitesimal lag between subject acquisition, journalistic structuring and public broadcast engenders a reflexive loop susceptible to subversive alteration. Considering the interpretive spectrum between ethical filtering of content and manipulative remixing of data, we must question the validity of the ‘factual’ information which permeates our everyday and consider the implications of its instantaneous dissemination. Does this new Media provide a means to accurately reflect upon the minute isolated events of which history, in an empirical sense, is composed?


Given this sociological framework, the work is not intended as a discourse on the axiom of ‘the evil nature of war’. It is merely a consideration of an event we have (or have not) witnessed, and a reflection on the iconic nature of conflict in this new millennium.

We get closer to the real not because we use a set of binoculars that do not distort the picture, but because we become aware that we are viewing the world through a set of distorting binoculars

—Morten Goll

Since the late 1990s, Collins’ diverse practice has addressed the act of image-making itself, reflecting on the status of the individual and the collective in today’s media-dominated society. Characteristic of the artist’s approach is a close engagement with place and communities, which over the years have included disco-dancing Palestinians, fans of The Smiths across three continents, the youth of Baghdad, and teachers of Marxism-Leninism in the former German Democratic Republic. The projects are often initiated through public announcements and structured as situations predicated on high emotional stakes. Rather than static portraits, the works resulting from these encounters articulate the nuances of relations embedded in the aesthetic regimes and economies that define our everyday existence, from news and politics to entertainment and shopping. Throughout, Collins’ work upholds his commitment to myriad forms of experience across the social spectrum, and furthers his interest in the contradictory impulses of intimacy and desire within the public sphere.

http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/2013/10/phil-collins-at-tanya-bonakdar/

Since the late 1990s, Collins’ diverse practice has addressed the act of image-making itself, reflecting on the status of the individual and the collective in today’s media-dominated society. Characteristic of the artist’s approach is a close engagement with place and communities, which over the years have included disco-dancing Palestinians, fans of The Smiths across three continents, the youth of Baghdad, and teachers of Marxism-Leninism in the former German Democratic Republic. The projects are often initiated through public announcements and structured as situations predicated on high emotional stakes. Rather than static portraits, the works resulting from these encounters articulate the nuances of relations embedded in the aesthetic regimes and economies that define our everyday existence, from news and politics to entertainment and shopping. Throughout, Collins’ work upholds his commitment to myriad forms of experience across the social spectrum, and furthers his interest in the contradictory impulses of intimacy and desire within the public sphere.

http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/2013/10/phil-collins-at-tanya-bonakdar/

Nora Schultz, Zero Ruler, 2007Sutton Lane, London/Paris

Nora Schultz, Zero Ruler, 2007
Sutton Lane, London/Paris

Fridericianum

Art’s task changes in a world suffused with generated images. It is imperative to reflect on what are often highly psychologically charged worlds of images, the ways they are reproduced, and represented. Over the last two decades, the relationships between image and text, language and body, body and space, subject and object have changed rapidly. Art’s brief is no longer to generate unique, original images, but to seek reflection in a de-subjectivized approach to the existing stocks of objects, images and spaces. The order of the day is to understand the world from the vantage point of abstraction and not to abstract from the world. The element of individual creation takes a back seat and the transfer of images and objects into the world of art becomes irrelevant as such. Today, visual reflection possesses a rhythmic, process-based and serial form. Serial repetition is less a matter of counterpointing sameness and difference and more a matter of weaving a never-ending web of relations; reflection can only occur within speculative variation.

In Ed Atkins’ videos penetrating, staccato-like sound and the serial poetry of incoherent narratives collide with the hyper-real presence and cold of animated human bodies. The line dividing the ostensible immaterial quality of his medium and the viewer’s corporeality are given an excessive spin. Surface, real and virtual spaces, digital imaging and analog staging are condensed and superimposed in Michele Abeles’ pieces to create complex image levels and meanings. Her work abandons the rigid symbolic order of things in favor of a constant circulation of images and changing angles of vision.

The Speculations on Anonymous Materials exhibition for the first time worldwide brings together approaches in international art that reinterpret the Anonymous Materials created by rapid and incisive technological change.

Paolo Chiasera, Juliette, 2010

Paolo Chiasera, Juliette, 2010

Absolutely gorgeous publication combining 22 stories by John Cage with photography by William Gedney

Absolutely gorgeous publication combining 22 stories by John Cage with photography by William Gedney